E-Dumping

Sina+Ranje+stands+next+to+one+of+the+many+electronics+recycling+boxes+around+the+Rockville+campus.+Ranje+hopes+to+raise+awareness+of+the+negative+effects+on+the+environment+caused+by+throwing+out+old+technology.+--+Photo+by%3A+Nick+Logan

Sina Ranje stands next to one of the many electronics recycling boxes around the Rockville campus. Ranje hopes to raise awareness of the negative effects on the environment caused by throwing out old technology. -- Photo by: Nick Logan

Original: February 22, 2011 Issue 11

By: Liz Whiting

Staff Writer

Sina Ranje stands next to one of the many electronics recycling boxes around the Rockville campus. Ranje hopes to raise awareness of the negative effects on the environment caused by throwing out old technology. -- Photo by: Nick Logan

Have you ever wondered what to do with that old laptop or first generation iPod? Or maybe you just have way too many old floppy disks sitting around. On Feb. 14, 2011, Macklin Business Institute and

Students in Free Enterprise students jump-started the Global E-Waste initiative. This project is focused on protecting our environment from harmful digital dumping. It also aims to inform the community as to how they could be contributing to the problem unknowingly.
Students Sina Ranje, George Kiarie and Darren Waldron head the project. They created this initiative as part of a SIFE Criterion for environmental sustainability as well as to expose the unethical practices and lack of social responsibility of businesses. They want to raise awareness of the problem while reducing the amount of digital waste.

“This problem has been hidden and avoided as the unglamorous side of the high tech revolution,” said Ranje. He wants this project to impact not only our school community, but our local community as well.

“We need to do our part now to help reduce domestic dumping and for people to stop contributing to the problem,” agreed Kiarie.

This issue of electronic waste has stemmed from the fact that it is cheaper for businesses to dump electronics in third world countries than to recycle them.

The problem with throwing away electronics is that they contain poisonous chemicals that harm our ecosystem and take thousands of years to disappear from the soil and water systems. Electronics contain toxins such as Barium, Lead and Mercury which could seep into our waterways resulting in side effects that range from cancer to vascular and kidney damage.

All of these recycled goods are being sent to licensed and certified companies such as one in Atlanta. If you go to the websites, they have certificates of authentic recycling methods and have been audited to ensure control of where the product gets recycled. You can go to Calltorecycle.org to learn more about their efforts.

You can also drop off electronics in these locations: Business Department, Macklin Business Institute, Library front desk, counselor building and outside the cafeteria. For larger items such as laptops, printers, and televisions, bring these to the Macklin Business Office.

To help out and receive more information you can e-mail Sina Ranje at sinaranje@gmail.com or George Kiarie at nikiarie@montgomerycollege.edu